Are We Americans Again?
A Portrait of Japanese American Internment

Plan Outline:

Click on links below to go directly to lesson plan for indicated day.

Time Required:

2 - 5 days. (Days 1 and 2: History and Overview can be taught independently in two class sessions.)

Materials Needed:

Student Objectives:

  1. Students will obtain historical data through the use of primary source documents.
  2. Students will describe elements of the Japanese American Internment during World War II, through discussion and writing.
  3. Students will develop a sense of historical understanding of the internees' experiences during and after the Internment.
  4. Students will relate the themes of tolerance and prejudice to the era.
  5. Students will evaluate the implementation of Executive Order 9066.
  6. Students will define and describe basic human rights and the role of an American citizen.

Assessment:

Days 1 - 5: Participation in discussion
Day 3: Using Primary Sources, a collaborative group activity
Day 4: Prejudice vs. Tolerance, homework prompt, individual response
Day 5: Citizenship, questions 1 - 6, collaborative and individual response

Standards Correlation:

The National Standards for the United States and World History emphasizes historical understanding. "History ... reveals the vast range of accommodations individuals and societies have made to the problems confronting them, and discloses the consequences that have followed the various choices that have been made."

The National Standards for the United States and World History encourages students to develop a sense of historical thinking. Middle school students should engage in activities in the following five areas:

  1. Chronological Thinking
  2. Historical Comprehension
  3. Historical Analysis and Interpretation
  4. Historical Research Capabilities
  5. Historical Issues-Analysis and Decision-Making

The National Council for the Social Studies recommends in "Strand 2: Time, Continuity and Change" that "students begin to understand and appreciate differences in historical perspectives, recognizing that interpretations are influenced by individual experiences, societal values, and cultural traditions."

The National Standards for Civics and Government in "Section V" focuses on the Roles of the Citizen in American Democracy.

Conceptual Links to Prior Understanding and Knowledge:

This unit works well taught

Cross-curricular Connections:

History - Language Arts - Art


[Continue to Lesson Plan Days 1 & 2]


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